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As part of the Dean Valley restoration project we today publish a draft of our first feasibility study, outlining recommendations for the repair and restoration of the Dean Valley walkway. The Dean Valley walkway is part of a wider historic designed landscape and constitutes an important walking and cycling route in north Edinburgh, which is in urgent need of renovation and upgrading. The Dean Valley Regeneration project aims to improve the shared amenity of the area for current and future generations by renovating the walkway and its surrounding historic landscape. Today, elements of the walkway’s designed landscape are affected by...
It is great to see the transformation along the Dean Valley walkway due to the recent clearing of old leaves and ivy by City of Edinburgh Council. It is a fantastic improvement as it is now much less muddy! However poor drainage is still a problem. DVRL continue to campaign to improve the environment in this beautiful riverside setting and we are looking forward to reaching our next major milestone with the publication of the first phase of our Feasibility Report which assesses how the path can be renovated. As ever we value the support of all who have an...
On Sunday the 19th February 39 Volunteers turned up for The Water of Leith Conservations Trust's Stockbridge clean-up and vegetation control task. On the The Water of Leith Conservation Trust's website we can read that: "On the 19th February the sun shone and an amazing amount of volunteers turned up for the Stockbridge clean-up and vegetation control task. We began to cut back the ivy, brambles and ash regeneration around St Bernards Well so later in the year we can being planting and improving the diversity of the area and protect some of the stone work. This project will been...
The distinctive village of Stockbridge can be said to extend from Saxe-Coburg Place in the north to St Bernard’s Well in the south, and from St Stephen’s Church in the east to the Grange Cricket Pavilion in the west. On this map you can see where this area is located. The blue pins denote the four above-mentioned locations whilst the orange pins show other significant locations. The Stock Bridge itself, originally made of wood, was replaced in stone in 1786, widened and strengthened in 1830, and rebuilt in its present form in 1900. A little further upstream, we find the...

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